If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site
We are OPEN and following CDC Guidelines

September 2021

Tuesday, 28 September 2021 00:00

What Causes Cracked Heels?

When the skin on the heel dries out and loses its strength and elasticity, the heel becomes hard, dry, and flaky. This leads to splitting, or fissuring and cracking, of skin around the heel which is more commonly known as cracked heels. While cracked heels usually form because of dry skin, wearing open-backed shoes, gaining weight, and increased friction from the back of the shoes can all lead to cracked heels forming as well. Common methods for managing cracked heels include moisturizing the heels twice per day, soaking the feet in warm water, and using a pumice stone on the affected area. However, excessively dry skin can indicate other problems such as neuropathy or diabetes. Patients who continually struggle with cracked heels should consult with a podiatrist to find the source of their issue.  

If the skin on your feet starts to crack, you may want to see a podiatrist to find treatment. If you have any concerns, contact Cynthia Ferrelli, DPM from New York. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

It is important to moisturize your cracked heels in order to prevent pain, bleeding, and infection. The reason cracked heels form is because the skin on the foot is too dry to support the immense pressure placed on them. When the foot expands, the dry skin on the foot begins to split.

Ways to Help Heal Them

  • Invest in a good foot cream
  • Try Using Petroleum Jelly
  • Ease up on Soaps
  • Drink Plenty of Water

Ways to Prevent Cracked Heels

  • Moisturize After Showering
  • Skip a Shower
  • Keep Shower Water Lukewarm
  • Don’t Scrub Your Feet

If you are unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels, seek guidance from a podiatrist. Your doctor will help you with any questions or information you may need. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Williamsville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

How Do Doctors Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a common complication of that can occur because of diabetes. People with diabetes often have poor circulation and neuropathy which make foot wounds slow to heal and difficult to detect. If your doctor spots a DFU on your foot, there are several potential treatment options, depending on the severity of the wound. Your doctor may debride the wound by removing dead tissue. A bandage will usually be placed over the wound to keep the area moist and protect it from infection. Taking pressure off of the wound, by resting the foot and using cushions, braces, or orthotics, will help it heal. In very severe cases, surgery may be necessary. If you have a DFU, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Cynthia Ferrelli, DPM from New York. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Williamsville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Friday, 17 September 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Overuse and repetitive motion is the cause of Sever’s disease. It is a condition that affects the heel of the foot in young children and teenagers, and typically occurs in active people of this age group. It happens as a result of the muscles, tendons, and ligaments pulling on the growth plate in the heel when overuse occurs. Common symptoms that are associated with this condition can consist of heel pain, and it is often worse upon arising in the morning. Effective treatments often begin with temporarily stopping the activity that caused the condition, followed by elevating the affected foot. If you notice your child is limping, please schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can properly treat Sever’s disease.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Cynthia Ferrelli, DPM from New York. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Williamsville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease

Achilles tendinopathy refers to the inflammation of the Achilles tendon, a thick band of tissue that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. Symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy include pain in the back of the ankle and heel that worsens with activity, a restricted range of motion, swelling, redness, heat, or a lump in the tendon. People who play sports and those who have flat feet or high arches are at an increased risk of Achilles tendinopathy. While mild injuries can respond well to home treatments like resting, icing, compressing, and elevating the affected leg, more severe injuries will need prompt attention from a medical professional. If you heard a popping or snapping sound before you began to feel pain or have severe pain that doesn’t improve over time, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist as soon as possible for treatment. 

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Cynthia Ferrelli, DPM of New York. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Williamsville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries
Connect with us