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Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

It is no secret that wearing high heels every day can be damaging to your feet and legs. Wearing them also creates a reduction in range of movement, balance control, step length, and ankle muscle movement. Some studies even suggest that musculoskeletal disorders may occur later in life as a result of wearing high heels regularly. A study conducted by the University of Alabama at Birmingham points to a doubling of high heel shoe-related injuries over a 10-year period, with most of those injuries affecting the feet and ankles. If you wear high heels on a regular basis and are experiencing any pain or discomfort, make an appointment with a podiatrist. They can examine and test you to diagnose the problem, as well as discuss treatment options which may include custom orthotics and footwear modifications to reduce the harmful effects high heels may be having on your feet and ankles. 

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Cynthia Ferrelli, DPM from New York. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which Parts of My Body Will Be Affected by High Heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What Kinds of Foot Problems Can Develop from Wearing High Heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How Can I Still Wear High Heels and Maintain Foot Health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Williamsville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Effect of High Heels on the Feet
Tuesday, 05 October 2021 00:00

If you have plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the ligament that runs along the bottom of the foot, then you likely deal with foot and heel pain. One way to relieve plantar fasciitis symptoms is to wear orthotics. There are several different types of orthotics used to treat plantar fasciitis. Heel cups or pads are placed in the back of your shoes. They lift up the heel slightly and cushion it, relieving tension in the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia. Shoe insoles are inserted into the shoes and run along the entire sole of the foot. They support the foot arches to reduce strain on the plantar fascia ligament. Night splints are devices that hold the foot in place while you sleep, gently stretching your ligaments and tendons to avoid heel pain in the morning. To find out if orthotics are right for you, please consult with a podiatrist. 

If you are having discomfort in your feet and would like to try orthotics, contact Cynthia Ferrelli, DPM from New York. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics are inserts you can place into your shoes to help with a variety of foot problems such as flat feet or foot pain. Orthotics provide relief and comfort for minor foot and heel pain but can’t correct serious biomechanical problems in your feet.

Over-the-Counter Inserts

Orthotics come in a wide variety of over-the-counter inserts that are used to treat foot pain, heel pain, and minor problems. For example, arch supports can be inserted into your shoes to help correct overarched or flat feet, while gel insoles are often used because they provide comfort and relief from foot and heel pain by alleviating pressure.

Prescription Orthotics

If over-the-counter inserts don’t work for you or if you have a more severe foot concern, it is possible to have your podiatrist prescribe custom orthotics. These high-quality inserts are designed to treat problems such as abnormal motion, plantar fasciitis, and severe forms of heel pain. They can even be used to help patients suffering from diabetes by treating foot ulcers and painful calluses and are usually molded to your feet individually, which allows them to provide full support and comfort.

If you are experiencing minor to severe foot or heel pain, it’s recommended to speak with your podiatrist about the possibilities of using orthotics. A podiatrist can determine which type of orthotic is right for you and allow you to take the first steps towards being pain-free.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Williamsville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ankle Foot Orthotics for Athletes
Tuesday, 28 September 2021 00:00

When the skin on the heel dries out and loses its strength and elasticity, the heel becomes hard, dry, and flaky. This leads to splitting, or fissuring and cracking, of skin around the heel which is more commonly known as cracked heels. While cracked heels usually form because of dry skin, wearing open-backed shoes, gaining weight, and increased friction from the back of the shoes can all lead to cracked heels forming as well. Common methods for managing cracked heels include moisturizing the heels twice per day, soaking the feet in warm water, and using a pumice stone on the affected area. However, excessively dry skin can indicate other problems such as neuropathy or diabetes. Patients who continually struggle with cracked heels should consult with a podiatrist to find the source of their issue.  

If the skin on your feet starts to crack, you may want to see a podiatrist to find treatment. If you have any concerns, contact Cynthia Ferrelli, DPM from New York. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

It is important to moisturize your cracked heels in order to prevent pain, bleeding, and infection. The reason cracked heels form is because the skin on the foot is too dry to support the immense pressure placed on them. When the foot expands, the dry skin on the foot begins to split.

Ways to Help Heal Them

  • Invest in a good foot cream
  • Try Using Petroleum Jelly
  • Ease up on Soaps
  • Drink Plenty of Water

Ways to Prevent Cracked Heels

  • Moisturize After Showering
  • Skip a Shower
  • Keep Shower Water Lukewarm
  • Don’t Scrub Your Feet

If you are unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels, seek guidance from a podiatrist. Your doctor will help you with any questions or information you may need. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Williamsville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a common complication of that can occur because of diabetes. People with diabetes often have poor circulation and neuropathy which make foot wounds slow to heal and difficult to detect. If your doctor spots a DFU on your foot, there are several potential treatment options, depending on the severity of the wound. Your doctor may debride the wound by removing dead tissue. A bandage will usually be placed over the wound to keep the area moist and protect it from infection. Taking pressure off of the wound, by resting the foot and using cushions, braces, or orthotics, will help it heal. In very severe cases, surgery may be necessary. If you have a DFU, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Cynthia Ferrelli, DPM from New York. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Williamsville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
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